Char Kuay Teow

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Char Kuay Teow

Char kway teow is stir-fried ricecake strips, is a popular noodle dish in Singapore. The dish is considered a national favourite in Singapore.

It is made from flat rice noodles kway teow, stir-fried over very high heat with light and dark soy sauce, chilli,  prawns, deshelled blood cockles, bean sprouts and chopped Chinese chives. The dish is commonly stir-fried with egg, slices of Chinese sausage, fishcake, beansprouts, and less commonly with other ingredients.

Char kway teow has a reputation of being unhealthy due to its high saturated fat content. However, when the dish was first invented, it was mainly served to labourers. The high fat content and low cost of the dish made it attractive to these people as it was a cheap source of energy and nutrients. When the dish was first served, it was often sold by fishermen, farmers and cockle-gatherers who doubled as char kway teow hawkers in the evening to supplement their income.

Roti Prata

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Roti Prata

Roti prata is a fried flour-based pancake that is cooked over a flat grill. It is usually served with a vegetable- or meat-based curry and is from Malaysia and Singapore.

It is prepared by flipping the dough into a large thin layer before folding the outside edges inwards. The dough is cooked on a flat round iron pan measuring about three feet in diameter. Other ingredients such as cooked mutton, onion and egg, cheese or banana, if desired, are added into the dough during the cooking process, which lasts two to three minutes. It is commonly served with a fish or chicken based curry. I remember when I was younger I used to eat it with sugar and trust me it tasted damn good!

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Mee Siam

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Mee Siam

Mee Siam is a dish of thin rice vermicelli. It is served with spicy, sweet and sour light gravy. The gravy is made from a rempah spice paste, tamarind, taucheo (salted soy bean) as well as chopped peanuts. Mee Siam is typically garnished with tau pok (tofu), scallions, bean sprouts, garlic chives, and lime wedges. However, if you like extra flavour you can add your own ingredient like fish cake slice or begedil (Fried Potato Patty).

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Cai Tow Kuay (Fried Carrot Cake)

Cai Tow Kuay (Fried Carrot Cake) is made with radish cake (steamed rice flour, water, and shredded white daikon), which is then stir-fried with eggs, preserved radish, and other seasonings. There are two versions to it. As shown above, “White” and “Black”. For the white version, egg is beaten on top to form a crust. The black version uses sweet sauce and egg to mix it with the carrot cake. So which version do I like? Definitely the white version, because of the crispiness and the taste of the chili.

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Prawn Noodle (Hae Mee)

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Prawn noodle (Hae Mee in hokkien) is a popular noodle soup dish in Singapore. There are a few types of noodles for you to choose from such as, Mee Pok, Mee Kia and Kuay Tiao. Traditionally, they are served with Yellow Noodle in dark flavoured soup. The noodle will be served with prawns, pork slices, fish cake slices, and bean sprouts topped with fried shallots and spring onion. The soup is made using dried shrimps, plucked heads of prawns, white pepper, garlic and other spices. The picture above is a “dry” version of the prawn noodle which flavouring comes from oil, vinegar, chili, soy sauce and the soup. It is best served with freshly cut red chili slices in light soy sauce.